Authors And Alcohol: The Paris Years

These three authors are literary greats and they were all present in Paris at the same time,

enjoying a lifestyle of creative endeavor and alcohol…

The great and the good of historical literary figures seem more often than not to have had a fairly intimate relationship with alcohol. It appears to have just gone with the territory. What follows are a list of some of the most influential writers who were all present in post WW1 Paris and couldn’t say no to a drink.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Author of the almost unsurpassable The Great Gatsby, Francis (that’s what the F stood for) was a heavy drinker from early in his college years. His work and he himself are seen as symbols of the Jazz Age and with good reason. Not only did he come up with the term, but his lifestyle and the people he surrounded himself with in 1920s Paris were absolutely indicative of the artistic revelry.

Unfortunately his drinking was epic and led him into seriously poor health during the 30s. He suffered from tuberculosis though biographers do argue over whether or not this was truly the case, with some speculating it was used as a cover for his drinking problems. Fitzgerald finally succumbed in 1940 to a second, and huge, heart attack. He was 44.

Ernest Hemmingway

Present in the revelry of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age was his good friend Ernest Hemmingway. The two shared an intense and vivacious friendship. Becoming part of the ‘Lost Generation’ a term he popularized during his Paris years the abandon of which he and his cohorts’ lives were lived is no secret. And after being introduced to James Joyce the pair became well known for their ‘alcoholic sprees’.

Hemmingway’s love of a beverage turned to alcoholism in his later years and was compounded by other health and mental issues. The result in 1961 was after treatment for severe depression and release from hospital Hemmingway took his own life.

James Joyce

Renowned for his works that include Ulysses and Finnegans Wake Joyce is undoubtedly one of the most significant writers of the 20th century. Growing up in Dublin he was often found boozing and causing plenty of trouble, seemingly being quick to anger and always involved in an altercation of sorts. After two such instances, one involving a pistol being fired at him by the student he lived with Joyce headed to Europe.

He lived in Trieste and Zurich for the next period of his life and after 16 years was invited to Paris by Erza Pound, a friend of both Fitzgerald and Hemmingway. Joyce stayed for 20 years. During his time there his lifestyle continued as he’d become accustomed and he died after surgery for a perforated ulcer in 1941.

Attached Images:

When not trying to live like a Parisian author of the Jazz Age, Sam Michaels writes for Find Me A Gift, taking a particular interest in their exceptional range of wine gifts.

 

Gravity

Planets are moving
To satisfy moons
Keeping gravity,
In check.
In tune.

The ocean is twirling
To nurture its’ sand
Hydrogen and oxygen
Secretly holding hands

Solar winds and satellites
Attracted in galactic tide
Cosmic carbon,
Constellations.
Elemental configurations.

As the sun brings a new day
To relieve a tired moon
I promise now and forever
To do the same for you

 

Igniting Your Creativity

A My Blog Guest Special Feature

Tips on Inspiration and Creativity

Igniting your creativity

Being creative is not just something that happens to people accidentally. You might start off with a spur of excitement concerning one idea or concept, but when it comes down to remaining creative over a longer period of time most people struggle. The term writer’s block is famous amongst all those working in a profession where creating text is key, but similar concepts apply to those in performing arts, visual artists and other creative professions. This article will provide a few tips on how you can maintain your creativity and potentially enhance it.

Listen to music

Music can set the mood for your day, but it can also help spark that creative light in you. If you feel stuck and don’t know how to move forward with a project, create a playlist that will push you forward. If you are writing, think about what your character would listen to or what genre your interview objects are interested in. If you are painting or creating visual art focus on the mood of the idea you already have and search online for artists reflecting that mood. Look at their lyrics and see where they take you. Maybe you find a story in them that compliments what you are working with, or maybe you are taken in an entirely new direction. Either or, it is sure to stir something up you can use.

Write it down

You never know when a great idea would come to mind. It can sneak up on you and take you completely by surprise. This is why so many artists and writers carry a notebook around with them. Take little bullet point notes of what you see, experience, feel and it can come in handy when you are trying to recall a memory or find inspiration later on. If you have a blank wall in your home hang up a large chalkboard. These won’t ruin the style of your home, and can be a valuable tool when you want to stay creative. Write down your bullet points on the board as soon as you come back home, then draw or expand on those bullet points. The chalk board will stop you from hanging post-its or having loose pieces of paper floating around, and it will allow you to gather all your ideas in one place.

Use the Internet

If you are stuck, there is nothing worse than just staring at your screen or your work. However, use the internet and get inspired. Use search engines to find images, music, text and so on about the topic you are working with. This might sound obvious but there is more to it than this. Look at the bullet points you made on your chalk board or notepad. Make a spider diagram by putting in words and phrases you find online. Soon you will start to see a red threat in you notes and this is the path you should follow when you feel ready to start work again.

Do not stop
Make sure you don’t let the block take over. If you feel stuck maybe you have gone down the wrong path. It is never too late to start over. The project you have developed can be picked back up at a later date when you might have had new experiences and challenges that will help you finish it. You are in charge of your creativity so don’t let the block control you, take charge.

Bio:
Ingunn is a creative personality writing about the arts and interior decorating, with a special love for chalkboards.

 

First Poetry Feature via My Blog Guest

It Dares You To Share

(A My Blog Guest Poetry Premier!)

Going up and going down in this crazy, calm world.
Floating over the attached world we live and die in.
With no and every cause to change and stay the same,
We stay and go while we sit and stare.

Waking and sleeping into a world of reality and dreams.
Hearing in silence while speaking wordlessly,
The days go by and stop in place.
Creativity is hard to see with easy eyes to miss it.
Around and through we jump and still.
Never be the days that are always around.

As we go over the hills and through the woods,
To our grandmother’s house we go.
It stings the toes and bites the nose.
As over the ground we go, to where the sidewalk ends.
And before the street begins,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight.

The place where the sidewalk ends is where I met a Raven.
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As if someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,’ I muttered, ‘tapping at my chamber door-
Only this, and nothing more.”

As they say to others, but don’t at all:
Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

So Mary has a little lamb with its fleece as white as snow,
But everywhere we travel now, we’re not sure where to go.

With money and time never enough,
We fight with days and long nights.
Together we flock in our floating worlds.
Cemented in spaces that are firmly held.

Never time to run away with always a time to stay.
Live and love and learn to say,
With words as soft and warm as day.
To always run and fly away,
The grandma and raven to us we fray.
As the sidewalk ends and Mary way,
To a good night of gentle we shouldn’t sway.
Being of us and we of they,
Tonight and always we have to play.

So visit and live with room to think,
Strangely, sleep is often the final link.

This uniquely compiled piece is a poem featuring combinations of lines from multiple famous authors such as Shel Silvertein and Edgar Allen Poe.

The first two and last two stanzas are composed solely by Miscelleana Rhinehart.

(with words mixed in throughout to make the lines fit together.)

About The Author:
Miscelleana Rhinehart is a passionate writer, sharing her thoughts with descriptive words and creatively strung sentences. Visit her imagined thoughts and Reed more.

I’m Not Playing With You

FUGAZI – ‘Blueprint’

Fugazi

(Fall 1987 – present)

Ian MacKaye – vocals, guitar
Guy Picciotto – vocals, guitar
Joe Lally – bass
Brendan Canty – drums

To all of those who have so graciously tuned in to the Gulkin Gazette this fine day, I’ve reserved for you a particularly significant, and superbly fitting spiffy Little Dittie!

This song says it all.. And what ‘it all’ is.. is soon to follow 🙂

-Alexandra E. Gulkin

Yep, that’s right, name in full. 

(It’s a Special Occassion)

The Deception of Mind

 

The Deception of Mind

I keep packing my bags

Chasing a life I will never know

Missing the things I never had

Getting weaker as I grow

 

Isn’t it funny,

The deception of mind?

Those memories falling

Into the small cracks of time

 

Lost in riddles and puzzles

And morphing design

Left to lie on blank spaces

In empty crossword lines

 

Isn’t is funny,

The subjection of time?

Those years lost to moments

Dissolved into wine

 

Aren’t you leaving,

Aren’t you gone,

Why must this ghost keep carrying on?

 

What is there that I wouldn’t give

What is there that I wouldn’t do,

To escape forever

This possession of you

 

Isn’t it funny,

The delusion of change?

I’ve been running for years

And still remain in this place

 

Naive in belief to be gaining ground

That strength will build as trials surmount

 

Self –deception is the most dangerous town

Those needs for mirage to keep the mind sound

 

Isn’t it funny,

The illusion of space?

In land and in homes

In the places we go

 

In the moving and chasing

In the running away

Just to wake the next morning

In the very same place

 

Aren’t you leaving,

Haven’t you gone?

Why must this ghost keep on carrying on?

 

What is there that I wouldn’t give

What is there that I wouldn’t do,

To escape forever

This possession of you

 

Alexandra E. Gulkin


Sunshine, begone, I will have no more of thee.

Sunshine, begone.

Sunshine, please yield your bright light,

Imposing fraudulent joy onto the sky;

Laughing at your own reflecting shine,

Denying the weeping of our burning eyes.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

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I miss the clouds. Today would be a great day for overcasted skies. I find such solace in the writings of Alfred Lord Tennyson. I’ve been reading through a collection of Tennyson’s best work that was published in 1893. How much things change, and how much they stay they truly do stay the same.

Reading these beautiful poems written over a century ago I’m finding that the evolution of mankind allows for the soul to still be in some way, timeless. There is a comfort in knowing that mankind has always known the same feeling of sorrow. and joy.  That the soul has always carried a heart that longs in hunger and a mind that seeks answer to its’ own wonders.

Song: A Spirit Haunts by Alfred Lord Tennyson (an excerpt)

My very heart faints and my whole soul grieves At the moist rich smell of the rotting leaves, And the breath Of the fading edges of box beneath, And the year’s last rose. Heavily hangs the broad sunflower Over its grave i’ the earth so chilly; Heavily hangs the hollyhock, Heavily hangs the tiger-lily.

≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡≡

This song is one of the many beautiful little ditties by

Jonah Montranga.

 

“Fathers and daughters, mothers and sons.

What came before and what will go on?

The memory of the night, the question of dawn,

In some little way one saves the next.”

 

More About this Artist At: http://jonahmatranga.com

Say not, “I have found the truth,” but rather, “I have found a truth.”

“Your hearts know in silence the secrets of the days and the nights.
But your ears thirst for the sound of your heart’s knowledge.
You would know in words that which you have always known in thought…

Say not, “I have found the truth,” but rather, “I have found a truth.”
Say not, “I have found the path of the soul.” Say rather, “I have met the soul walking upon my path.”…

For the soul walks upon all paths.
The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.
The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals.”

Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet
Kahlil Gibran
Kahlil Gibran-On Self Knowledge

 An unforgettable passage from an unexpetedly life-changing literary work of ‘The Prophet’ by Kahlil Gibran (1923).  Here’s hoping you enjoy this little ditty of literature.

-Alex Press